Creative Commons

Understanding Creative Commons Licenses

There are only four “conditions” of a CC licenses:

These four “conditions” can be combined to create six different licenses. These six licenses describe the conditions you might want to apply to your work. Below, I have listed them from least to most restrictive, as described on the CC website < http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses> :

Attribution Share Alike (Open Education Resources)

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build from your work even for commercial reasons, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use.

Attribution No Derivatives

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

Attribution Non-Commercial

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. Others can download and redistribute your work just like the by-nc-nd license, but they can also translate, make remixes, and produce new stories based on your work. All new work based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also be non-commercial in nature.


Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, allowing redistribution. This license is often called the “free advertising” license because it allows others to download your works and share them with others as long as they mention you and link back to you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.


 

Creative Commons License
Understanding OER for Librarians by Diane Gill is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
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